The Nest by R Dale Biller

The whole theme of the poem dangles between two breaths- a deep one that craves for fresh air to survive and the next that is purposely held back in order to meet a hasty end to an otherwise irreversible and painful ordeal of difficult survival.

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Title: The Nest

Author: R Dale Biller

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Date of Publication: 25 July 2017

Genre: Poetry

Rating: 5/5

“Again, the story

the story is told

is told so bold

so bold its lost

its lost to them

to them and me

and me you see

you see Again”

A renewed retelling of the end times fiasco in chaotic Boschian terms.

Set on planet Earth in an unknown time frame at the brink of the earth’s destruction, Biller reconstructs the doomsday prophecy on the basis of a new kind of spiritual knowledge that is yet to be discovered by the mankind. The earthly existence has been through two evolutions and is now in its third day of survival after which it will inevitably perish. A Prophet is sent by a Divinity whose nature is yet undefined. They are referred to as the ‘Great Ones’. But they are a higher power that seeks to warn man of his end. The faith is termed as ‘aqua faith’ and water is the greatest metaphor that is all pervasive throughout the poem. While it is water which surrounds the embryo in the womb and acts as a basic necessity of man but in the poem this life sustaining substance turns into severe toxicity. This imagery is brought about by the river of flowing fire which engulfs completely the people residing beside it.

The imagery is highly metaphoric but starkly in contrast to what is expected. It is a quest narrative but not one in which there is a search till the end for the true self. Man has already degraded himself beyond proportions. It needs to return to the Divine and put its faith therein.  There are no knightly battles to be fought on horseback and, hence, no treasures to be unraveled from the bounty of the earth. The Earth has already been over exploited and left exasperated for breath. The whole theme of the poem dangles between two breaths- a deep one that craves for fresh air to survive and the next that is purposely held back in order to meet a hasty end to an otherwise irreversible and painful ordeal of difficult survival. Pantheistic notions do not work any longer as the Earth has been distorted beyond recognition and has nothing more to offer. One can only save oneself through higher transcendence and by progressing the spiritual ladder.

There is a taste of Blake’s four Zoas. The descriptions are relayed in no particular sequence but as and how the narrative moves along. War is seen as the ultimate destroyer and must be overturned by hook or crook. That is Alvarius’ greatest task and challenge which will prove his true prophethood as the saviour of mankind. Nuances can be traced to Greek and Roman myths though it is hard to say which ones in particular. The ideas become a medley of several myths and prophecies. Alvarius is hard to define but has touches of Shelley’s Prometheus along with Milton’s Samson. Alvarius thinks aloud about his tasks at hand but he is never seen praying to the Gods or desperately seeking help. He merely goes about his work with a quiet dedication. Newer characters are added to the narrative like the matriarch Anqet, the Red Bird and the King who had a golden temple. These moralistic digressions only add to the metaphoric lessons within the poem. Though an experimental work, the thought behind the book is very original and so is the patterning of the work. Some very contrary set of words are placed together making the vocabulary interesting but thoughtful at the same time. Metaphors are juxtaposed upon metaphors. Moments are punctuated by the emotions of life and the need to integrate a collective desire of the civilisation to escape annihilation. This can only be achieved if the world learns to think in a unified manner.

The most interesting aspect is the code table that inaugurates the book. The poem is made up of several smaller poems whose titles are written in a coded language that needs to be deciphered by the readers as they go along the book. The equivalent English letters to the code language is listed on the opening pages(also seen on the cover page below the title). It makes the book almost like a secret pamphlet that readers have procured from somewhere. However, at several points the narrative gets so cryptic that it almost turns obscure leaving several interpretations possible. But again, it is this obscurity that brings together a large reading audience that is usually uninterested in epics of a spiritual nature. Biller states that it is this chaos that will give place to clarity eventually. At best the suspense is fascinating and at worst it is frustrating- to not be able to give even distant meanings to the common words and phrases. There is a constant mixture of prose and lyric. While the prose assists in sorting out the narrative, the lyrics are too metaphoric. It is not a casual easy read. It is time consuming and needs the reader to immerse deeply into the narrative. It is perhaps more to be felt than understood and certainly a lot to be thought over making it highly relevant.

“The idea is

that when we let our shadows or

darker energy console our future in

real time we create a world where

hope becomes our quote “Black tea

in the lush”. We lose the realization

of possibility and we miss out on the

grand opportunity. “All aspects of

the future must be respected to a

point of clarity” heard the world

from the dark clouds forming in the

distance. An Alvarius disguise.”

Click the book cover to grab your copy. Happy Reading!

Conspiracies: Conspiracy Theories – The Most Famous Conspiracies Including: The New World Order, False Flags, Government Cover-Ups, CIA, & FBI by Alex Monaldo

Every chapter ends with a “What to Believe” section that provides a balanced guidance to the reader so that they don’t get carried away by these facts. Some ideas are bizarre and others are too strange to be processed.

Title: Cospiracies: Conspiracy Theories- The most famous Conspiracies Including: The New World Order, False Flags, Government Cover -Ups, CIA, & FBI

Author: Alex Monaldo

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Date of Publication: 26 September 2016

Genre: History/ Politics

Rating: 5/5

“There is no history of mankind, there are only many histories of all kinds of aspects of human life. And one of these is the history of political power. This is elevated into the history of the world.”

-Karl Popper

A book of intriguing facts about the secretive workings of You-Know-Who.

In a fervent attempt to uncover the truth behind some of the greatest mysteries of the world, Mondalo brings this fascinating book full of intriguing theories and factual data bound to stir the spirit. The book argues that the real functioning of the world is run by people that are hidden behind dark curtains of unknown mysteries and can never be caught. Apparently, real power does not lie with the elected leaders. The elected leaders are merely puppets in the hands of a pantheon of enlightened individuals who have distorted the Chain of Being in presenting themselves as a Godly pantheon with the power dominate and abuse.

The book begins with the establishment of the New World Order and Freemasonry that have inscribed in the very Constitution of American politics certain symbolic secrets. Only those who can decipher these will understand a hidden meaning. Assuming the Biblical testimony of the End times is believed by all, Monaldo shows religious inclinations as the basis of understanding and reaching his speculations. A lot of facts are supported with logical evidence but most of it seems like an educated assumption. Monaldo does not coax the reader into coming to any rigid conclusions; making the book highly autonomous. The spirit of free thinking and democracy is maintained. It is claimed that a lot of these institutions is based on occult practices that have pagan roots.

Certain assertions may come across as a little instinctive such as the idea of the Illuminati having started the French revolution although history notes the pioneers of the French Revolution to be Napoleon, Robespierre and others. However, it is surprisingly true that Freemasonry played an important role in the French Revolution which began apolitically but was radicalised by the late 18th century. Now whether one agrees to it or laughs its off as a joke, Monaldo accepts the idea that there is no denying the fact that such organisations are very well capable of pulling off such acts. The book further charts down a lot of recent debacles such as 9/11 attacks, spread of cancer as a man- made disease of the pharmacological industry, functioning of the music industry and addresses their chief conspirators to be the Illuminati or its allies. Like any conspiracy theory it all sounds like a porridge of unbelievable ideas that ultimately depends on whether one believes it or not. There are endless angularities to this topic that is highly controversial and debatable.

Nevertheless, the book presents some very startling ideas that are bound to rattle any reader’s mind who’s never come across this before. From false flags, chem trails, mysteries behind the 9/11 attacks, Bermuda triangle stories and the rise of militant groups, the author mentions the loopholes and inconsistencies in the investigation of these events. Every chapter ends with a “What to Believe” section that provides a balanced guidance to the reader so that they don’t get carried away by these facts. Some ideas are bizarre and others are too strange to be processed. It might as well be laughed off as a joke entirely except perhaps for some Dan Brown fans. But the book also provides proof of some conspiracy theories that did happen in real. Towards the end it becomes an index of well known and unknown conspiracy theories. Monaldo seems to be urging his readers to be diligent and continue to remain sceptical instead of blindly believing anything and everything that is presented before their eyes.

Click the book cover to grab your copy. Happy Reading!

Asian History: Asian History: India, China by Edward Pannell and Raymond C Nelson

Both the books in the bundle are good introductory guides to India and China. However, placing the two together in the bundle does not mean that they have any content corresponding to one another or in terms of the political, social, economic and interpersonal relations of the two nations. Pannell and Nelson have added to the appeal of the collection with their own unique insight. 

Title: Asian History: Asian History: India, China

Authors: Edward Pannell and Raymond C Nelson

Publisher: Amazon Asia Pacific Holdings Private Limited

Date of Publication: 14 September 2017

Genre: History/ Politics

Rating: 4/5

“India is the cradle of the human race, the birthplace of human speech, the mother of history, the grandmother of legend, and the great-grandmother of tradition. Our most valuable and most instructive materials in the history of man are treasured up in India only.”- Mark Twain

An unbiased and concise guide that delves into the very heart of the Indian subcontinent.

Opening with the inevitable enchantment that the very name has left for ages on the minds of people, Edward Pannell vows to leave no stone unturned. Drawing on the exotic ambience that became the reason for invaders to want to occupy this land, Pannell presents a historical perspective from the days of “milk and honey”. The narrative begins with the medieval era, ever since which the rise and demise of several ruling dynasties left India to be juggled from one hand to the other only to augment its magnetism. The French, Portuguese and European naval arrivals led to the British settlements leaving the final blow to the subcontinent by forcing its split into 3 parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Noting the various impressions on this land, he dissects the evolution of Indian history in a precise and factual manner. The counter events and civil revolutions are pitched with pros and cons to the original events that have several political bases. Pannell masters the art of presenting such a vivid and vibrant picture within mere 55 pages.

The language of the book is concise with short sentences that are easily understood. His apt choice of words presents the facts in a scientific and precise manner. Everything is to the point. The book follows a chronological movement of events. Images are patterned in the order in which they actually occurred. Pannell does not provide any personal detailing or added comments. The book serves as a handy guide for those interested in visiting or are already planning a trip to India in the near future. It may even be used as an introductory course book for school.

Some interesting facts included in the book are: corruption is not the only reason for India’s regression; it is the largest democracy in the world; falls in the category of one of the top 10% of wealthy nations; though a large section of the society is lives in abject poverty struggling for access to basic necessities. For those above them in the social strata things aren’t any better. They can only avail infrastructure and employment facilities that are below average in comparison to a lot of the world. Yet, India poses to be a promising superpower on the rise. The addition of “Interesting Facts” and “Pop Quizzes” at the end of each chapter makes the book more engaging. It highlights that one of the primary characteristics of India’s rich culture and heritage is its unity in the midst of diversity. It reassures of making a visit to India a unique experience that once attracted tourists because of its well established education, cultural and spiritual centres which explains the presence of eligible Indian origin workforce abroad, the spread of Ayurveda and the global practice of yoga to name a few.

The book gives an overview into everything Indian but it does not provide any travel tips though it may complement a travel guide well. Towards the end of the book is some useful information about sight-seeing in Delhi, visiting the Taj Mahal in Agra or Jaisalmer forts and Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad though the information is limited and misses out travel tips on the whole. However, the book helps in forming a connection with India to those who are absolutely alien to its rich history and culture.

Effortless, briefly enlightening and a very helpful handbook.

“A journey of a thousand miles, / begins at one’s feet.” Dao De Jing

Raymond Nelson returns with yet another concise but detailed coverage of Chinese history in terms of its economic, political, cultural and religious heritage. The book begins with the task of clarifying the misconception that the isolation of China had made it weak and not as prosperous as its Western contemporaries. Though trading with the West had stopped abruptly during the Ming Dynasty but it only made it a strong economic driving force in the region. The book opens with a timeline of China’s dynastic leagues from the Prehistoric Times through the Xia, Shang, Qin, Xin, Sui, Liao dynasties to the modern day People’s Republic of China established in 1949. Some of these dynasties are elaborated in detail along with the workings of the famous Silk Route.

China has emerged as a modern rising nation though in the past it had to battle the invasion of Genghis Khan and his ancestors who marked a fairly long reign. Again during World War II, Mao Zedong’s Communist Party allied with the Nationalist party to take a leap forward in Chinese politics. This became a major turning point in Chinese history and can be seen as laying the ethic of combining industry and agriculture which is very inclined towards the betterment of the working classes and is anti- capitalist. Despite the ups and downs China’s significant role in the entrepreneurial global chessboard and its influence cannot be denied. The book also shows China’s remarkable online growth in spite of its state controlled media. Very summarily, it also sketches the growing smartphone and fashion industry that has been able to create rippling effects globally, making China a tough global competitor. Further, the book shows the stages of development in the Chinese language and script along with chapters on the therapeutic effects of Chinese medicinal practices. Chinese religious beliefs and cultural mores find mention in their influence, depth and far reaching appeal. An aspect of China’s outreach is its film industry full of world famous actors and composers. While their folk tales talk about the rich culture, the various tourist attractions give an idea about the beauty of Chinese landscape and makes the book a good introductory guide for those planning their next trip to China. On the whole though Nelson seems to be giving more emphasis on successful Chinese foreign policies by sketching out China’s relations with various Western (first) world countries, Nelson chooses only to dwell on the best and positive aspects. Chinese societal or environmental issues do not find any mention. The information, thus, is rather basic and generalised which makes the book a tad bit lengthy but it definitely covers most things Chinese. The lack of illustrations can make it hard to keep focus throughout but it can be a good introductory guide for those interested in China, Asia or the far East.

Both the books in the bundle are good introductory guides to India and China. However, placing the two together in the bundle does not mean that they have any content corresponding to one another or in terms of the political, social, economic and interpersonal relations of the two nations. Pannell and Nelson have added to the appeal of the collection with their own unique insight.

Click the book cover to grab your copy. Happy Reading!

China: History of China – History of an Empire: A Historical Overview of China & East Asia. Including: Ancient China, Communism & Capitalism (Chinese … Medicine, Mao Zedung, Confucius Book 2) by Raymond C Nelson

Very summarily, it also sketches the growing smartphone and fashion industry that has been able to create rippling effects globally, making China a tough global competitor.

Title: China: History of China- History of an Empire: A Historical overview of China & East Asia. Including : Ancient China, Communism & Capitalism (Chinese…Medicine, Mao Zedung, Confucius Book 2)

Author: Raymond C Nelson

Publisher: Raymond C Nelson

Date of Publication: 26 August 2016

Genre: History/ Politics

Rating: 3.7/5

china

“A journey of a thousand miles, / begins at one’s feet.” Dao De Jing

Raymond Nelson returns with yet another concise but detailed coverage of Chinese history in terms of its economic, political, cultural and religious heritage. The book begins with the task of clarifying the misconception that the isolation of China had made it weak and not as prosperous as its Western contemporaries. Though trading with the West had stopped abruptly during the Ming Dynasty but it only made it a strong economic driving force in the region. The book opens with a timeline of China’s dynastic leagues from the Prehistoric Times through the Xia, Shang, Qin, Xin, Sui, Liao dynasties to the modern day People’s Republic of China established in 1949. Some of these dynasties are elaborated in detail along with the workings of the famous Silk Route.

China has emerged as a modern rising nation though in the past it had to battle the invasion of Genghis Khan and his ancestors who marked a fairly long reign. Again during World War II, Mao Zedong’s Communist Party allied with the Nationalist party to take a leap forward in Chinese politics. This became a major turning point in Chinese history and can be seen as laying the ethic of combining industry and agriculture which is very inclined towards the betterment of the working classes and is anti- capitalist. Despite the ups and downs China’s significant role in the entrepreneurial global chessboard and its influence cannot be denied. The book also shows China’s remarkable online growth in spite of its state controlled media. Very summarily, it also sketches the growing smartphone and fashion industry that has been able to create rippling effects globally, making China a tough global competitor. Further, the book shows the stages of development in the Chinese language and script along with chapters on the therapeutic effects of Chinese medicinal practices. Chinese religious beliefs and cultural mores find mention in their influence, depth and far reaching appeal. An aspect of China’s outreach is its film industry full of world famous actors and composers. While their folk tales talk about the rich culture, the various tourist attractions give an idea about the beauty of Chinese landscape and makes the book a good introductory guide for those planning their next trip to China. On the whole though Nelson seems to be giving more emphasis on successful Chinese foreign policies by sketching out China’s relations with various Western (first) world countries, Nelson chooses only to dwell on the best and positive aspects. Chinese societal or environmental issues do not find any mention. The information, thus, is rather basic and generalised which makes the book a tad bit lengthy but it definitely covers most things Chinese. The lack of illustrations can make it hard to keep focus throughout but it can be a good introductory guide for those interested in China, Asia or the far East.

Conspiracies, Bundle I: Conspiracies, UFOs and Aliens by Alex Monaldo

Nevertheless, the book presents some very startling ideas that are bound to rattle any reader’s mind who’s never come across this before.

Title: Conspiracies, Bundle I: Conspiracies, UFOs and Aliens

Author: Alex Monaldo

Publisher: Amazon Digital Services LLC

Date of Publication: 22 September 2017

Genre: History/ Politics

Rating: 5/5

“There is no history of mankind, there are only many histories of all kinds of aspects of human life. And one of these is the history of political power. This is elevated into the history of the world.”

-Karl Popper

A book of intriguing facts about the secretive workings of You-Know-Who.

In a fervent attempt to uncover the truth behind some of the greatest mysteries of the world, Mondalo brings this fascinating book full of intriguing theories and factual data bound to stir the spirit. The book argues that the real functioning of the world is run by people that are hidden behind dark curtains of unknown mysteries and can never be caught. Apparently, real power does not lie with the elected leaders. The elected leaders are merely puppets in the hands of a pantheon of enlightened individuals who have distorted the Chain of Being in presenting themselves as a Godly pantheon with the power to dominate and abuse.

The book begins with the establishment of the New World Order and Freemasonry that have been inscribed in the very Constitution of American politics certain symbolic secrets. Only those who can decipher these will understand their hidden meaning. Keeping in mind the Biblical testimony of the End Times, Monaldo shows examples from religion that explain his basis of understanding and confirming these speculations. A lot of facts are supported with logical evidence but most of it seems like an educated assumption. Monaldo does not coax his readers into coming to any rigid conclusions; making the book highly autonomous. The spirit of free thinking and democracy is maintained. It is claimed that a lot of these institutions are based on occult practices that have pagan roots.

Certain assertions may come across as a little instinctive such as the idea of the Illuminati having started the French revolution although history notes the pioneers of the French Revolution to be Napoleon, Robespierre and others. However, it is surprisingly true that Freemasonry played an important role in the French Revolution which began apolitically but was radicalised by the late 18th century. Now whether one agrees to it or laughs its off as a joke, Monaldo accepts the idea that there is no denying the fact that such organisations(if at all they exist and are fully operational) are very well capable of pulling off such acts. The book further charts down a lot of recent debacles such as 9/11 attacks, spread of cancer as a man- made disease of the pharmacological industry, inner occultist functioning of the music industry and addresses their chief conspirators to be the Illuminati or its allies. Like any conspiracy theory it all sounds like a porridge of unbelievable ideas that ultimately depends on whether one believes it or not. There are endless angularities to this topic which makes it all highly controversial and debatable.

Nevertheless, the book presents some very startling ideas that are bound to rattle any reader’s mind who’s never come across this before. From false flags, chem trails, mysteries behind the 9/11 attacks, Bermuda triangle stories and the rise of militant groups, the author mentions the loopholes and inconsistencies in the investigation of these events. Every chapter ends with a “What to Believe” section that provides a balanced guidance to the reader so that they don’t get carried away by thefacts. Some ideas are bizarre and others are too strange to be processed. It might as well be laughed off as a joke entirely or ridiculed, except perhaps for some Dan Brown fans. But the book also provides proof of some conspiracy theories that did happen in real. Towards the end it becomes an index of both well known and unknown conspiracy theories. Monaldo seems to be urging his readers into becoming more diligent and to continue to remain sceptical instead of blindly believing anything and everything that is presented before their eyes(with special mention to the media).

Flashlights beam into the dark abysmal interiors of the caves as a team of forensic and legal experts make their way inside cautiously. A large white oval structure with craters the size of the moon lies amidst the rocks. The experts take out their equipment and begin to collect samples of stones, sand and rock. Suddenly, the whole place starts to shake wildly as small rock pieces drop onto the people. The egg shows cracks. Within a split second it breaks apart to reveal a large headed monstrous figure with big black eyes and tiny thin limbs. It is earless, nose less with a metallic grey skin with four fingers on its hands and radiates light from its head.  Horrifying and alien.

Such is a common description out of many Hollywood sci-fi movies that have featured alien invasions on Earth as their central themes. The book begins by sorting out common misconceptions about people who believe in aliens as they are neither lying nor Un- Christian or mad. Each chapter begins with a photograph or picture of flying saucers, lights in the sky, jet trails or funny looking confused aliens peering at the readers. Individual chapters open with bullet points about the contents to be covered in that particular chapter. Under the heading “In This Chapter You Will Learn” gives a crisp idea about what is to be expected in the discussions within the chapter. The book dissects the concept of aliens beginning from the pop culture with the oval shaped flying saucers and literary representations as seen in H. G. Well’s The War of Worlds that shows an alien invasion on London. The book goes on to index different types of aliens both good and bad. As with any other species, aliens come in various shapes, sizes and colours. Individual generic names are provided with a short write up about their characteristics. The cute alien images atop the descriptions are really delightful. These colourful images add to the amusement and interest of an otherwise contentious matter. The topic is highly entangled with various conspiracy theories. Bullet points provide information about a series of alien invasions, sightings and even abductions that have been reported. Inseparable from the UFOs, have been the crop circle mysteries that are yet to find any scientific explanation. Some ancient spiritual practices, beliefs and secret societies also worshiped alien beings and these are noted with utmost precision. A lot of facts are truly intriguing and striking but some of it, as the book itself claims, is largely unconfirmed. Whether it is considered as a natural phenomenon, a trumpet call to apocalypse, a morbid joke, a frivolous gossip or a dreadful horror, the aliens have proved to be inseparable from human life and existence. One of the final chapters provides such thirty “Fun Facts”. Monaldo even provides some Dos and Don’ts regarding the kind of attitude one should keep towards such extra terrestrial beings or happenings. With numerous uncanny twists and turns, it is truly an interesting book to be read from cover to cover.

A persuasive bundle of mind boggling facts.

Click the book cover to grab your copy. Happy Reading!

UFOs & Aliens: UFO Secrets- Area 51, Alien & UFO Encounters, Alien Civilizations & the New World Order by Alex Monaldo

The cute alien images atop the descriptions are really delightful. These colourful images add to the amusement and interest of an otherwise contentious matter.

Title: UFOs & Aliens: UFO Secrets- Area 51, Alien & UFO Encounters, Alien Civilizations & the New World Order

Author: Alex Monaldo

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Date of Publication: 13 May 2016

Genre: History/ Politics

Rating: 5/5

Flashlights beam into the dark abysmal interiors of the caves as a team of forensic and legal experts make their way inside cautiously. A large white oval structure with craters the size of the moon lies amidst the rocks. The experts take out their equipment and begin to collect samples of stones, sand and rock. Suddenly, the whole place starts to shake wildly as small rock pieces drop onto the people. The egg shows cracks. Within a split second it breaks apart to reveal a large headed monstrous figure with big black eyes and tiny thin limbs. It is earless, nose less with a metallic grey skin with four fingers on its hands and radiates light from its head.  Horrifying and alien.

Such is a common description out of many Hollywood sci-fi movies that have featured alien invasions on Earth as their central themes. The book begins by sorting out common misconceptions about people who believe in aliens as they are neither lying nor Un- Christian or mad. Each chapter begins with a photograph or picture of flying saucers, lights in the sky, jet trails or funny looking confused aliens peering at the readers. Individual chapters open with bullet points about the contents to be covered in that particular chapter. Under the heading “In This Chapter You Will Learn” gives a crisp idea about what is to be expected in the discussions within the chapter. The book dissects the concept of aliens beginning from the pop culture with the oval shaped flying saucers and literary representations as seen in H. G. Well’s The War of Worlds that shows an alien invasion on London. The book goes on to index different types of aliens both good and bad. As with any other species, aliens come in various shapes, sizes and colours. Individual generic names are provided with a short write up about their characteristics. The cute alien images atop the descriptions are really delightful. These colourful images add to the amusement and interest of an otherwise contentious matter. The topic is highly entangled with various conspiracy theories. Bullet points provide information about a series of alien invasions, sightings and even abductions that have been reported. Inseparable from the UFOs, have been the crop circle mysteries that are yet to find any scientific explanation. Some ancient spiritual practices, beliefs and secret societies also worshiped alien beings and these are noted with utmost precision. A lot of facts are truly intriguing and striking but some of it, as the book itself claims, is largely unconfirmed. Whether it is considered as a natural phenomenon, a trumpet call to apocalypse, a morbid joke, a frivolous gossip or a dreadful horror, the aliens have proved to be inseparable from human life and existence. One of the final chapters provides such thirty “Fun Facts”. Monaldo even provides some Dos and Don’ts regarding the kind of attitude one should keep towards such extra terrestrial beings or happenings. With numerous uncanny twists and turns, it is a truly an interesting book to be read from cover to cover.

Click the book cover to grab your copy. Happy Reading!

The Santa Corner by Jakie Rodriguez

Thematically the book focuses on the idea of “sharing is caring” but it extends this moralistic indication to sharing out of and despite one’s human limitations to those underprivileged and in need. “Santa Corner” then becomes a metaphor for charity and selflessness that are to be inculcated at a young age.

Title: The Santa Corner

Author: Jakie Rodriguez

Publisher: Mascot Books

Date of Publication: 6 December 2016

Genre: Children’s Literature

Rating: 5/5

Ho! Ho! Ho!

Merry Christmas!

Meghyn and Gracie are very close school buddies. Meghyn loves going over to Gracie’s house at playtime. And what do two girlfriends do when they get together? Sure they giggle. And they giggle more.

Amidst the fun filled chaos of stuff toys, dolls, tents and toy trains, Gracie discovers a toy that stands out from the lot. But Meghyn won’t let her play with it. What is this toy and why does Meghyn snatch it away from Gracie? Aren’t they the best of friends ever?

A brightly coloured book of barely thirty pages, The Santa Corner is a great conversation starter with your little one about the joys of playtime, friendship and the toys they own. The book is easy to read and directed at elementary school children who may have just begun to read or are yet in the process of reading seriously in class or at bedtime. With its fabulous illustrations by the very talented Bee L Hannah, the characters of Meghyn and Gracie are brought to the forefront of a striped pink and white background. Thematically the book focuses on the idea of “sharing is caring” but it extends this moralistic indication to sharing out of and despite one’s human limitations to those underprivileged and in need. “Santa Corner” then becomes a metaphor for charity and selflessness that are to be inculcated at a young age. It does not denote merely a corner to put aside their old used toys that they do not enjoy playing with anymore. Keeping in mind the readership group, the language of the book is easy with no difficult vocabulary except perhaps the introduction of a few new words. Most pages have only 2-3 lines. The illustrations cover most of the pages and are done with such accuracy that almost every written word comes to life. “Santa’s letter” and “Santa’s Nice List” (with the names of all good boys and good girls) are put beside a roly poly Santa who sends his helpers only at night to collect the toys. So, much like the tooth fairy, he’s never seen by the kids which only gives them more reason to be curiously attentive about the entire process. Though the book is a fun read for all ages but it is more oriented towards little girls taking their primary education.

Has your letter from Santa arrived in the mail too? Find out.

Sweet, simple and splendid.

Click the book cover to grab your copy. Happy Reading!